News from C.A.R.

  • NAR has named 10 REALTORS® as finalists of REALTOR® Magazine's 2017 Good Neighbor Award; two of which are California REALTORS®. The award honors REALTORS® who make an extraordinary impact on their community through volunteer work, donating their time and passion to improve and enrich the lives of the people in their communities.

    On Oct. 3, five winners will be named from among the 10 finalists. Winners will receive a $10,000 grant and national media exposure for their community charity, including a feature in the Nov./Dec. issue of REALTOR® Magazine. The winners will also receive travel expenses to the 2017 REALTORS® Conference & Expo in Chicago, where they will accept their awards at a presentation in front of thousands of their peers. In addition, five honorable mentions will receive a $2,500 grant.

    The public can also vote for their favorite of the 10 Good Neighbor finalists. The three finalists who get the most votes will be Web Choice winners and will take home additional donations of $2,500, $1,250 and $1,250 respectively. Cast votes between Sept. 5 and Oct. 2.

    The California REALTORS® named as finalists are Mony Nop of Mony Nop Real Estate in Livermore and Kay Wilson-Bolton of Century 21 Troop Real estate in Santa Paula.

    Nop created a nonprofit to encourage kids to set goals and achieve them by providing leadership training and scholarships. He uses his own experience as a child who fled the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia during the 1970s to motivate thousands of middle school and high school students to overcome their own challenges. Read how he's helping build tomorrow's leaders.

    Wilson-Bolton founded Many Meals, which feeds up to 600 people a hot meal every Wednesday. She also distributes 30,000 pounds of food per month through a food bank, and, as an ordained chaplain, runs a reception center behind her real estate office where she counsels people in need. Read how she's helping feed the hungry.

    Vote here for Nop or Wilson-Bolton between Sept. 5 and Oct. 2.

    Created: 9/21/2017 5:56:54 PM
  • Since 2003, the National Association of REALTORS® has dedicated September as REALTOR® Safety Month.

    Whether you're showing a property, meeting a new client or communicating online, it's important to ensure you have an existing personal safety protocol.

    NAR offers members an array of other safety resources, including tips and articles, safety training videos, courses and presentation materials, and safety-focused webinars available here. All are part of the ongoing efforts to communicate and educate REALTORS® about safety throughout the year.

    Created: 9/21/2017 5:56:54 PM
  • For release:
    August 23, 2017

    California pending home sales trend lower in July from previous month and year

    LOS ANGELES (Aug. 23) – The strong sales momentum that occurred during the peak home-buying season gave way in July as shrinking housing inventory and waning affordability stifled pending home sales, which declined both from the previous month and year, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today.

    Coming out of the summer home-buying months, the housing market is showing signs of slowing as REALTORS® reported fewer floor calls, listing appointments, and less open house traffic than in June, C.A.R.'s July Market Pulse Survey** found.

    Pending home sales data:

    • Based on signed contracts, year-over-year statewide pending home sales fell in July on a seasonally adjusted basis, with the Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI)* declining 2.6 percent from 122.5 in July 2016 to 119.4 in July 2017. California pending home sales also edged down on a monthly basis for the first time since March, decreasing 0.9 percent from the June index of 120.4.

    • Pending home sales have declined on an annual basis for six of the last seven months so far this year, however, the pace of decline has slowed in recent months. After a solid run-up of pending sales growth in April, May, and June, continued housing inventory issues and affordability constraints may have pushed the market to a tipping point, suggesting the pace of growth will begin to slow in the fall.

    • The Southern California Region was the only major region to record an increase in pending sales from the previous year – the third straight annual gain. Los Angeles, San Bernardino County and Orange County saw healthy spikes of 4.0 percent, 6.0 percent, and 4.6 percent, respectively. Pending sales in San Diego (-5.8 percent) and Riverside (-4.2 percent) counties declined from last July.

    • Pending sales in the Central Valley slipped 0.3 percent from the previous year, led by a 17.8 percent annual decrease in Sacramento County. Additionally, Kern County reversed a healthy pending sales gain in June and decreased 2.6 percent from last July.

    • The San Francisco Bay Area experienced the largest drop in pending sales in July, falling 11.5 percent on an annual basis. San Francisco and San Mateo counties, two of the state's most expensive markets, were both down in double-digits, 11.0 percent and 21.4 percent, respectively. Santa Clara County, where home prices also are at all-time highs, saw pending sales decline 9.8 percent from a year ago.
    • C.A.R.'s newest market indicator of future price appreciation, Market Velocity Index – home sales relative to the number of new listings coming on line each month to replenish that sold inventory – suggests that there remains upward pressure on home prices through the fall. Home sales continued to outstrip new listings, further depleting the supply of active listings last month.

    • While the Market Velocity Index fell from 42 to 37, this still implies that there were 37 percent more homes sold than there were new listings. In other words, the supply of homes available for sale continued to drop, which will make the remaining units more competitive as net supply has deteriorated by roughly 34,000 units this year. Thirty-five of 49 counties tracked sold more homes than new listings that came online in those areas, suggesting that price growth will remain broad-based geographically as well.

    Year-to-Year Change in Pending Sales by County/Region

    County/Region/State July 2017 July 2016 Yearly % Change
    Counties
    Kern 71.3 73.2 -2.6%
    Los Angeles 86.6 83.3 4.0%
    Orange 79.4 75.9 4.6%
    Riverside 53.9 56.2 -4.2%
    San Diego 133.2 141.4 -5.8%
    San Bernardino 76.1 71.8 6.0%
    Monterey 62.6 72.6 -13.7%
    Sacramento 66.6 81.0 -17.8%
    San Francisco 75.9 85.3 -11.0%
    San Mateo 84.2 107.1 -21.4%
    Santa Clara 84.8 94.1 -9.8%
    Santa Cruz 112.6 111.7 0.7%
    Regions
    SF Bay Area 126.8 143.3 -11.5%
    So. CA 113.1 111.5 1.4%
    Central Valley 102.6 102.9 -0.3%
    California (SA)* 119.4 122.5 -2.6%

    *Seasonally adjusted


    July REALTOR® Market Pulse Survey**:

    • The share of homes selling above asking price edged up from 34 percent a year ago to 35 percent in July, while the share of properties selling below asking price remained flat at 36 percent. The remaining 29 percent sold at asking price, down from 30 percent in July 2016.

    • For homes that sold above asking price, the premium paid over asking price rose from 8 percent in July 2016 to 9 percent in July 2017.

    • The 36 percent of homes that sold below asking price sold for an average of 13 percent below asking price in July, compared to 14 percent a year ago.

    • About two-thirds (64 percent) of properties sold in July received multiple offers, down from 66 percent in July 2016, and the number of offers received was unchanged at 2.8 offers.

    • The share of properties receiving three or more offers in July was 40 percent, compared to 44 percent a year ago.

    • Market competitiveness increased the most in homes priced $750,000-$999,999 and $1 million-$1,999,999, which posted the largest gains in receiving three or more offers compared with last year, rising from 36 percent to 53 percent and from 38 percent to 46 percent, respectively.

    • Listing price reductions decreased from 26 percent a year ago to 21 percent in July.

    • While lessening from June, a lack of available inventory remained at the top of the list of concerns for REALTORS®, with 30 percent indicating it as their biggest concern. Declining housing affordability/high interest rates concerned 28 percent of REALTORS®, while inflated home prices/housing bubble was cited by 25 percent of REALTORS®. A slowdown in economic growth, lending and financing, and policy and regulations rounded out REALTORS®' remaining biggest concerns.

    • REALTORS®' expectations of market conditions over the next year ticked up from 52 in June to 55 in July and is still in positive territory.

    Graphics (click links to open):

    YTY change in pending home sales by region.
    Pending sales vs. closed escrow sales.
    Fewer properties selling below asking price.
    Multiple offers decrease.
    Market competitiveness by price segment.
    Market Velocity – indicator of future price appreciation.

    *Note: C.A.R.'s pending sales information is generated from a survey of more than 70 associations of REALTORS® and MLSs throughout the state. Pending home sales are forward-looking indicators of future home sales activity, offering solid information on future changes in the direction of the market. A sale is listed as pending after a seller has accepted a sales contract on a property. The majority of pending home sales usually become closed sales transactions one to two months later. The year 2008 was used as the benchmark for the Pending Homes Sales Index. An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2008.

    **C.A.R.'s Market Pulse Survey is a monthly online survey sent to more than 10,000 California REALTORS® to measure data about their last closed transaction and sentiment about business activity in their market area for the previous month. More than 400 REALTORS® responded.
    Leading the way...® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 190,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.


    Created: 9/21/2017 5:56:54 PM
  • For release:
    Sept. 18, 2017

    California housing market defies tight inventory as sales and median price propel higher

    - Existing, single-family home sales totaled 427,630 in August on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, up 1.5 percent from July and 1.3 percent from August 2016.
    - August's statewide median home price was $565,330, up 2.9 percent from July and 7.2 percent from August 2016.
    - At the regional level, the San Francisco Bay Area, Inland Empire, and Los Angeles metro area all registered year-to-year sales increases of 6.5 percent, 8.2 percent, and 4.4 percent, respectively.

    LOS ANGELES (Sept. 18) – California's housing market defied gravity as existing home sales and median home price registered increases on both a monthly and an annual basis in August, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today.

    Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California remained above the 400,000 benchmark for the 17th consecutive month and totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 427,630 units in August, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2017 if sales maintained the August pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

    The August sales figure was up 1.5 percent from the 421,460 level in July and up 1.3 percent compared with home sales in August 2016 of a revised 422,190. Year-to-date sales are running 2.7 percent ahead of last year's pace, but have curtailed since the first quarter.

    "While August's strong housing market performance is encouraging, it's really a tale of two markets. Despite sales growth across all segments of the market, lower-priced homes are particularly inventory constrained, which leads to weaker sales growth, faster rising prices, and fierce competition for the few homes that are listed," said C.A.R. President Geoff McIntosh. "These homes are selling faster than historically and for top dollar, adversely impacting entry-level buyers who are already struggling to afford to buy their very first home."

    The statewide median price reached its highest level in a decade and remained above the $500,000 mark for the sixth straight month. The median price rose 2.9 percent from $549,460 in July to $565,330 in August and climbed 7.2 percent from the revised $527,490 recorded in August 2016. The median sales price is the point at which half of homes sold for more and half sold for less; it is influenced by the types of homes selling, as well as a general change in values.

    "A shortage of available homes for sale continues to stoke robust growth in home prices," said C.A.R. Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Leslie-Appleton-Young. "August marked the third straight month that the median price gained 7 percent or more year-over-year, indicating that prices are not only growing, but are accelerating into the end of the year. For the most inventory constrained segment of the market – the bottom 20 percentile – home prices rose even higher with a double-digit gain (10.7 percent)."

    Other key points from C.A.R.'s August 2017 resale housing report include:

    • All of the major regions experienced robust month-to-month and annual gains, with Inland Empire jumping 8.2 percent from a year ago, the San Francisco Bay Area rising 6.5 percent, and the Los Angeles metro region increasing 4.4 percent from August 2016.
    • San Francisco overtook San Mateo as the most expensive market in the state.
    • With consistent home price growth, even the most affordable markets are facing rising prices. California is no longer home to a single county with a median price below $200,000, and only 10 of 58 counties have a median price lower or equal to the national median price of $258,300.
    • Statewide active listings continued to decline, dropping 11.9 percent from a year ago.
    • With strong sales growth and little new inventory to replenish the housing supply, C.A.R.'s Unsold Inventory Index fell from 3.2 months in July to 2.9 months in August. The index measures the number of months needed to sell the supply of homes on the market at the current sales rate. The index stood at 3.4 months in August 2016.
    • Housing supply remained tight throughout the state as every single county in both the San Francisco Bay Area and Southern California saw a reduction in unsold inventory, as did most parts of the Central Coast and Central Valley.
    • The median number of days it took to sell a single-family home was 18 days compared with 16 days in July and 28 days in August 2016.
    • C.A.R.'s sales price-to-list price ratio* was 99.5 percent statewide in August, 100 percent in July, and 98.9 percent in August 2016. At the county level, San Francisco had the highest ratio at 114.8 percent and Mono had the lowest at 93.8 percent.
    • The average price per square foot** for an existing, single-family home statewide was $268 in August, $270 in July, and $250 in August 2016.
    • San Francisco had the highest price per square foot in August at $871/sq. ft., followed by San Mateo ($863/sq. ft.), and Santa Clara ($668/sq. ft.). Counties with the lowest price per square foot in August included Siskiyou and Lassen (both at $129/sq. ft.), Kern ($135/sq. ft.), and Tulare ($136/sq. ft.).
    • Mortgage rates declined further in August as the 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rate averaged 3.88 percent in August, down from 3.97 percent in July but was up from 3.44 percent in August 2016, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable-rate mortgage interest rates ticked down in August to an average of 3.15 percent from 3.22 percent in July but was up from 2.74 percent in August 2016.

    Graphics (click links to open):
    Calif. historical existing home sales.
    Calif. historical median home price.
    Sales performance by price range.
    Calif. price per square foot.
    Calif. sales to list price ratio.

    Note: The County MLS median price and sales data in the tables are generated from a survey of more than 90 associations of REALTORS® throughout the state, and represent statistics of existing single-family detached homes only. County sales data are not adjusted to account for seasonal factors that can influence home sales. Movements in sales prices should not be interpreted as changes in the cost of a standard home. The median price is where half sold for more and half sold for less; medians are more typical than average prices, which are skewed by a relatively small share of transactions at either the lower-end or the upper-end. Median prices can be influenced by changes in cost, as well as changes in the characteristics and the size of homes sold. The change in median prices should not be construed as actual price changes in specific homes.

    *Sales-to-list price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and home sellers under current market conditions. The ratio is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price and is expressed as a percentage. A sales-to-list ratio with 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, and a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.
    **Price per square foot is a measure commonly used by real estate agents and brokers to determine how much a square foot of space a buyer will pay for a property. It is calculated as the sale price of the home divided by the number of finished square feet. C.A.R. currently tracks price-per-square foot statistics for 39 counties.

    Leading the way?® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 190,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

    # # #

    August 2017 County Sales and Price Activity
    (Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

    August-17 Median Sold Price of Existing Single-Family Homes Sales
    State/Region/County Aug-17 Jul-17 Aug-16 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg Sales MTM% Chg Sales YTY% Chg
    CA Single-family (SAAR) $565,330 $549,460 R $527,490 R 2.9% 7.2% 1.5% 1.3%
    CA Condo/Townhomes $446,760 $443,160 $419,260 R 0.8% 6.6% 9.7% 1.8%
    Los Angeles Metro Area $499,970 $508,810 R $473,300 R -1.7% 5.6% 11.5% 4.4%
    Inland Empire $341,340 $344,040 R $316,630 R -0.8% 7.8% 10.8% 8.2%
    San Francisco Bay Area $856,200 $898,880 $777,160 -4.7% 10.2% 9.4% 6.5%
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Alameda $867,500 $875,500 $775,000 -0.9% 11.9% 12.9% 6.4%
    Contra-Costa $627,860 $633,250 $570,000 -0.9% 10.2% 16.6% 11.0%
    Marin $1,207,120 $1,224,000 $1,200,000 -1.4% 0.6% -15.7% 9.6%
    Napa $654,000 $695,000 $625,000 -5.9% 4.6% 5.0% -4.5%
    San Francisco $1,380,000 $1,428,000 $1,257,500 -3.4% 9.7% 1.0% 9.7%
    San Mateo $1,375,000 $1,500,000 $1,250,000 -8.3% 10.0% 6.1% -7.7%
    Santa Clara $1,150,000 $1,165,000 $975,000 -1.3% 17.9% -2.0% 11.9%
    Solano $410,000 $420,000 $410,000 -2.4% 0.0% 21.9% -2.5%
    Sonoma $625,500 $645,000 $585,000 -3.0% 6.9% 24.2% 8.8%
    Southern California
    Los Angeles $575,130 $573,190 R $524,420 R 0.3% 9.7% 14.8% 3.4%
    Orange $789,000 $785,000 $749,000 0.5% 5.3% 6.1% 0.5%
    Riverside $388,500 $385,500 $355,000 0.8% 9.4% 6.3% 3.3%
    San Bernardino $269,950 $266,250 $240,500 R 1.4% 12.2% 18.0% 16.1%
    San Diego $605,000 $613,000 $563,000 -1.3% 7.5% 11.0% 4.9%
    Ventura $640,000 $648,500 R $609,000 R -1.3% 5.1% 11.4% -0.2%
    Central Coast
    Monterey $580,500 $629,000 $515,000 -7.7% 12.7% 20.0% 9.6%
    San Luis Obispo $599,000 $590,000 $535,000 1.5% 12.0% 12.5% 6.1%
    Santa Barbara $631,000 $611,000 $775,000 3.3% -18.6% 24.0% 21.9%
    Santa Cruz $825,000 $815,000 $824,000 1.2% 0.1% 24.8% -11.6%
    Central Valley
    Fresno $259,000 $258,000 $239,000 0.4% 8.4% 12.5% 13.8%
    Glenn $225,000 $205,000 $230,500 9.8% -2.4% -4.8% 42.9%
    Kern $235,100 $235,000 $220,000 0.0% 6.9% 4.3% -0.7%
    Kings $225,000 $222,000 $209,220 1.4% 7.5% 5.7% 18.1%
    Madera $263,500 $279,250 $245,000 -5.6% 7.6% -26.1% -28.6%
    Merced $250,000 $260,000 $220,000 -3.8% 13.6% 22.9% 19.3%
    Placer $462,000 $453,000 $430,000 2.0% 7.4% 16.3% 12.8%
    Sacramento $348,000 $353,000 $323,500 -1.4% 7.6% 5.0% -4.2%
    San Benito $600,000 $535,000 $538,380 12.1% 11.4% 28.8% 34.0%
    San Joaquin $355,000 $350,000 $325,000 1.4% 9.2% 21.1% 12.0%
    Stanislaus $294,290 $297,000 $272,750 -0.9% 7.9% 12.3% 7.8%
    Tulare $224,900 $219,950 $204,900 2.3% 9.8% 6.4% 3.6%
    Other Counties in California
    Amador $334,500 $320,000 $257,500 4.5% 29.9% -9.4% 4.3%
    Butte $291,000 $299,900 $264,120 -3.0% 10.2% 4.6% 1.0%
    Calaveras $345,000 $324,500 $310,000 6.3% 11.3% 40.0% 8.6%
    Del Norte $214,950 $204,900 $174,500 4.9% 23.2% 36.8% 44.4%
    El Dorado $485,000 $480,500 $425,000 0.9% 14.1% 29.2% 9.2%
    Humboldt $316,750 $307,500 $290,000 3.0% 9.2% 2.6% -11.1%
    Lake $241,500 $265,000 $234,500 -8.9% 3.0% 29.7% -7.7%
    Lassen $215,000 $171,000 $185,000 25.7% 16.2% 0.0% -13.8%
    Mariposa $280,000 $262,500 $311,500 6.7% -10.1% 45.5% -20.0%
    Mendocino $402,500 $370,000 $362,500 8.8% 11.0% -5.3% -15.6%
    Mono $386,500 $578,000 $532,500 -33.1% -27.4% -36.8% -50.0%
    Nevada $375,000 $398,500 $343,000 -5.9% 9.3% 2.4% -13.4%
    Plumas $325,000 $325,000 $275,000 0.0% 18.2% 45.7% 21.4%
    Shasta $252,450 $255,000 $248,000 -1.0% 1.8% 12.2% 10.9%
    Siskiyou $212,000 $215,000 $204,500 -1.4% 3.7% 7.0% -11.5%
    Sutter $289,000 $280,300 $267,410 3.1% 8.1% 38.6% 18.3%
    Tehama $225,000 $206,750 $202,000 8.8% 11.4% 28.1% -19.6%
    Tuolumne $292,000 $292,500 $266,450 -0.2% 9.6% 47.8% 18.6%
    Yolo $445,000 $426,750 $410,480 4.3% 8.4% 17.6% -9.4%
    Yuba $265,000 $266,890 $249,900 -0.7% 6.0% -3.6% -16.5%

    r = revised
    NA = not available

    August 2017 Unsold Inventory and Time on Market
    (Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

    August-17 Unsold Inventory Index Median Time on Market
    State/Region/County Aug-17 Jul-17 Aug-16 Aug-17 Jul-17 Aug-16
    CA SFH (SAAR) 2.9 3.2 3.4 18.0 16.0 r 28.0 r
    CA Condo/Townhomes 2.2 2.4 2.7 r 14.0 14.0 r 29.0 r
    Los Angeles Metro Area 3.1 3.6 3.7 22.0 20.0 r 44.0 r
    Inland Empire 3.3 3.7 4.1 25.0 23.5 r 45.0 r
    S.F. Bay Area 1.9 2.1 2.5 R 15.0 14.0 r 20.0 r
    r
    S.F. Bay Area
    Alameda 1.6 1.8 2.1 13.0 13.0 r 14.0 r
    Contra Costa 1.9 2.2 2.4 13.0 12.0 r 13.0 r
    Marin 3.0 2.3 3.6 39.0 31.0 r 39.0 r
    Napa 4.6 4.7 4.8 49.5 45.0 r 41.0 r
    San Francisco 1.7 1.4 2.2 15.0 15.0 r 25.0 r
    San Mateo 1.7 1.7 2.0 r 11.0 11.0 r 14.0 r
    Santa Clara 1.5 1.5 2.4 r 9.5 10.0 r 15.0 r
    Solano 2.2 2.7 2.8 34.0 31.5 r 38.0 r
    Sonoma 2.6 3.3 2.9 37.0 38.0 r 48.0 r
    Southern California
    Los Angeles 2.8 3.3 R 3.3 18.0 17.0 r 40.0 r
    Orange 3.1 3.4 3.7 22.0 17.0 r 53.0 r
    Riverside 3.2 3.5 4.1 26.0 24.0 r 48.5 r
    San Bernardino 3.4 4.0 4.0 r 24.0 23.0 r 38.0 r
    San Diego 2.6 2.9 3.3 14.0 13.0 r 17.0 r
    Ventura 4.4 5.0 R 4.5 r 46.0 43.5 r 52.0 r
    Central Coast
    Monterey 4.2 5.0 4.9 r 26.0 21.0 r 18.0 r
    San Luis Obispo 3.9 4.6 4.4 23.0 16.0 r 31.5 r
    Santa Barbara 3.7 4.7 4.6 26.0 25.0 r 32.0 r
    Santa Cruz 3.3 4.2 3.0 r 20.0 14.0 r 21.0 r
    Central Valley r
    Fresno 2.9 3.2 3.5 16.0 13.0 r 20.0 r
    Glenn 4.2 3.5 6.9 47.5 17.0 r 22.5 r
    Kern 3.3 3.4 3.8 19.0 18.0 r 23.0 r
    Kings 2.4 2.9 3.2 21.0 28.0 r 19.5 r
    Madera 4.9 3.8 4.1 33.0 30.0 r 51.0 r
    Merced 2.6 3.2 2.8 15.0 13.0 r 34.0 r
    Placer 2.5 2.9 3.0 14.0 11.0 r 17.0 r
    Sacramento 2.4 2.3 2.5 11.0 9.0 r 12.0 r
    San Benito 2.6 3.5 4.2 r 28.0 23.5 r 21.5 r
    San Joaquin 2.5 2.9 3.1 14.0 13.0 r 15.0 r
    Stanislaus 2.4 2.8 3.1 14.0 12.0 r 15.0 r
    Tulare 3.7 3.8 3.5 23.0 24.0 r 25.0 r
    Other Counties in California
    Amador 6.0 5.2 5.8 39.0 32.0 r 47.0 r
    Butte 2.5 2.7 3.3 17.5 11.0 r 21.5 r
    Calaveras 4.8 6.8 4.9 27.5 38.5 r 30.0 r
    Del Norte 7.2 9.5 9.6 90.5 94.0 r 117.5 r
    El Dorado 3.5 4.7 3.8 38.0 27.0 r 34.0 r
    Humboldt 4.9 4.8 3.3 19.0 14.0 r 16.0 r
    Lake 5.1 6.5 4.6 24.0 34.5 r 92.5 r
    Lassen 8.1 7.5 NA 91.0 70.0 r 85.0 r
    Mariposa 4.8 7.6 4.3 66.5 32.5 r 82.5 r
    Mendocino 6.6 6.2 6.0 66.0 71.0 r 72.5 r
    Mono 9.2 6.0 6.5 r 74.0 93.0 r 95.0 r
    Nevada 3.9 4.3 3.3 19.0 18.0 r 23.0 r
    Plumas 8.0 11.5 10.3 94.0 99.0 r 94.5 r
    Shasta 4.1 4.6 4.5 21.0 21.0 r 34.0 r
    Siskiyou 6.9 7.2 6.0 52.0 40.0 r 37.0 r
    Sutter 2.8 3.6 2.8 21.0 14.0 r 15.0 r
    Tehama 6.4 7.4 4.7 60.0 48.5 r 47.0 r
    Tuolumne 4.4 7.0 5.4 29.0 30.5 r 42.5 r
    Yolo 2.4 2.9 2.1 13.5 10.0 r 15.0 r
    Yuba 3.0 2.8 2.4 13.0 12.5 r 13.0 r

    r = revised
    NA = not available

    Created: 9/21/2017 5:56:54 PM
  • For release:
    September 15, 2017

    California REALTORS® applaud advancement of state housing bills package

    LOS ANGELES (Sept. 15) – The CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) today issued the following statement in response to the passage of a package of housing bills that will help address the state's housing affordability crisis:

    "REALTORS® throughout the state applaud the California Legislature for taking action to address the state's historic housing supply crisis. These are complex issues that required significant negotiation and ultimately, compromise on all sides," said C.A.R. President Geoff McIntosh.

    "The result is a package of bills that, with Gov. Brown's signature, will be a great foundation for continued action at the state and local levels to meet California's housing needs. We must always recognize that until people have the ability and opportunity to buy or rent a home in California, our work is not done. Homeownership is the vehicle for individual prosperity that can help the state fulfill its economic potential."

    "The California Association of REALTORS®, representing more than 190,000 brokers and agents across the Golden State, looks forward to continued collaboration with the governor and Legislature."

    Leading the way?® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 190,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

    Created: 9/21/2017 5:56:54 PM
  • Last week, Equifax said hackers gained access to company data in a cybersecurity incident that could potentially affect 143 million people. The information accessed includes names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver's license numbers. Additionally, credit card numbers for approximately 209,000 people and certain dispute documents with personal identifying information for approximately 182,000 U.S. consumers, were accessed.

    According to Equifax, the unauthorized access occurred mid-May through July 2017. Equifax has established a dedicated website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, to help consumers determine if their information has been potentially impacted and to sign up for credit file monitoring and identity theft protection. A dedicated call center is also available at 866-447-7559.

    As a result of the hack, consumers are vulnerable to fraud by cyber criminals and other scam artists.

    Here are some things to watch for:
    • Phishing emails that claim to be from Equifax where you can check if your data was compromised
    • Phishing emails that claim there is a problem with a credit card, your credit record, or other personal financial information
    • Calls from scammers that claim they are from your bank or credit union
    • Fraudulent charges on any credit card because your identity was stolen. Thieves may be able to open new credit card or bank accounts in your name with the information that was hacked via Equifax.

    Here are additional steps to take to prevent identity theft:

    • Sign up for credit monitoring. While Equifax is offering one free year of credit monitoring to all consumers (not just those affected by the breach), you may also have access through other relationships, such as your banking institution, an appropriate membership level with the Automobile Club of Southern California, or other industry professional organizations.
    • Set up credit freeze to lock your credit files so when a thief uses your Social Security number to apply for credit in your name, lenders will be unable to retrieve the report without your direct intervention because of the freeze. Generally, it is not possible to sign up for credit monitoring services after a freeze is in place. California law concerning filing a credit freeze is available here.
    • Sign up for free credit reports via the free annualcreditreport.com. Consumers are entitled to one free credit report every year from all three major reporting agencies. Alternate these over the year and check once every four months.
    • Set up fraud alerts with the three major credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. This will alert you if someone tries to apply for credit in your name.
    • If you believe you may have been the victim of identity theft, here is a site where you can learn more about how to protect yourself: www.idtheftcenter.org. You can also call the center's toll-free number (888-400-5530) for advice on how to resolve identify-theft issues. All of the center's services are free.

    Created: 9/21/2017 5:56:54 PM